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Your December Youth Hoops Newsletter!
December 04, 2006
Hello,

Youth Hoops, December 2006 - Season Kick-Off!

December 4, 2006

Here is the latest issue for youth basketball coaches, players and parents.

Also, if you haven't received it yet, here is the FREE Special Report you get for subscribing to my newsletter!

Enjoy!

Table of Contents

    1. Coach's Corner
    2. Rules Of The Game - Game Situations
    3. Basketball Game - Free Throw Checklist
    4. Inspirational Quotes
    5. Basketball Terms
    6. Product Spot Light - eFundraising Program
    7. Media Center - Swish & Swish 2
    8. Pass It On


1. Coach's Corner

Well the 2006 season is well under way for everyone by now. I know some of the youth leagues still haven't started - but they will shortly. Our youth league will be starting this Saturday. Boy are my sons (11 & 9) excited about that!! They've been down at the court and out in the driveway practicing almost everyday in anticipation of this new season.

As we all enter into our season, I think it's important for me to mention a few things in regard to our overall approach to the game. This information applies to parents, players and coaches. Please keep these thoughts in mind throughout your entire season - in the good times and bad.

Parents: 1. Always be supportive of your child. ALWAYS! Win or lose, succeed or fail, good or bad - you must support, encourage and love your child. 2. Do not pressure your child. This is a game that is meant to be enjoyed - let them have fun. 3. Do not live vicariously through your child. Your past accomplishments or failures on the basketball court shouldn't have any impact on your child's experience.

Players: 1. Treat your teammates and opponents with respect. 2. Follow all team and league rules. 3. Always practice and play with a clear mind. 4. Play under emotional and physical control at all times. 5. Encourage and compliment good performances by your teammates and opponents.

Coaches: Understand that you have multiple roles and responsibilities to your players. 1. You are a teacher of the game and of life in many ways. 2. You are a friend that your players count on. 3. You are a substitute parent in many situations. These players need you more than ever. 4. You are a medical advisor. Be sure you have the proper training and supplies. 5. You are a disciplinarian. Set the team rules and stick to them - your players will respect that. 6. You are a cheerleader for your team. Encourage and support your players at all times.

By keeping these important thoughts in mind, your season will be much more enjoyable and successful. Remember your role and responsibilities as you approach this great game! Enjoy and best of luck!!

There have been many updates made to the Ultimate Youth Basketball Guide, be sure to check them out!

If you'd like an easy way to stay current with all the updates simply subscribe to my Youth Basketball Blog.


2. Rules of the Game - Game Situations

Okay I know what you're thinking - what do game situations have to do with rules of the game. Well...these are rules or guidelines that coaches can follow to become more effective at handling game situations. These are not the technical rules of the game, but more the strategic rules!

I have borrowed these ideas from Morgan Wooten, who is just a phenomenal coach, teacher and writer. I would highly recommend any and all of his books.

So...as a coach there are many issues related to game situations that you must effectively plan for and deal with. The list below outlines these issues.

  • Try to keep a consistent starting five. Don't make changes and shuffle the line-up after each game.

  • Use your scouting report to decide on match-ups and how to take away your opponent's strengths.

  • Determine your critical match-ups. Who will guard your opponent's best scorer.

  • Be involved in the game - don't be a spectator.

  • Stay under control at all times. You are the leader and role model of your team. Coaches who lose their cool have players who do the same. That's unacceptable!

  • Only make minor adjustments to your game plan during the game. Major adjustments during the game are usually unsuccessful. That should be done during practice.

  • Have a plan for personnel and substitutions. Don't make it up as you go. Have a plan and stick to it.

  • Follow your instincts during the game - they're usually right!

  • Save your time-outs if at all possible. They are so valuable toward the end of the first half and the game. Don't waste them.

  • Make sure your time-out procedure is organized so you don't waste time.

  • Keep all talks during time-outs, halftime and after the game as positive as possible. If your team played hard, there's no need for negative talk!

  • Keep your players level-headed at all times. They should never get too high or too low during the game. Level-headed and under control.

  • Handle winning and losing with pride, class and dignity. If the team played hard and to their potential than they should be proud of their outcome - win or lose.

  • Discuss tactics and strategies with your players at the next practice - not after the game.


3. Basketball Game - Free Throw Checklist

The free throw is probably the simplest shot taken in basketball. Just think about it for a minute. The player is not guarded, has time to get set and focus on the basket, has time to relax and prepare for the shot, and has an uninterrupted shot at the hoop. Sounds easy enough!!

As simple and easy as that sounds, the free throw continues to be a major problem for many shooters - regardless of their level of competition.

This is such a critical aspect of the game, especially down the stretch when the game is close. Many close games are won and lost on the free throw line.

So to help players improve their approach to shooting free throws they need to concentrate on and improve the following areas:

1. Get into a comfortable stance at the free throw line.

2. Relax, breathe and stay calm.

3. Perform a pre-shot routine. Keep it simple and consistent.

4. Focus on the basket and visualize the shot going in.

5. Start the shot motion the same way every time.

6. Use the legs to generate force for the shot.

7. Release the shot with confidence. Know that it will go in!

8. Always relax and do your best.

For more great tips on shooting, visit our shooting techniques page!


4. Inspirational Quotes - Principles To Live and Coach By

Here are some inspirational, motivational and truthful words by high school coaching legend Morgan Wooten. (Can you tell I read his book this month!)

  • Players are working with you - not for you.

  • Be interested in finding the best way - not your own way.

  • It's the little things that make the big things happen; life is just one small victory after another.

  • There is no progress without change. Yet all change is not progress.

  • Be yourself. Don't compare yourself to others.

  • When you disagree, do so without being disagreeable. Keep emotions under control.

  • Never discipline to punish; discipline to teach.

  • Don't let what you can't do interfere with what you can do. Don't be affected by what you cannot control.

  • Base decisions on performance, not potential.

  • Team accomplishments are more important than individual achievements. Always exhaust "We" before "I."

WOW! What great words from an incredible coach!

For more great inspirational quotes, please visit our basketball quotes page!

By the way, if you have a favorite inspirational quote that you'd like to share with us, send it to me. I'll include it in the next issue!


5. Basketball Terms

This is a new section I have just added to the newsletter. Knowing and understanding the various terms used in the game of basketball will help players, parents and coaches have a better understanding of the overall game.

That makes sense, doesn't it?! If you don't know what the coach or ref is talking about during a practice or game, then it makes the game that much more difficult to learn and understand.

Anyway...each month I'll include five new basketball terms for you to learn and study. You may already be familiar with many of these terms. If you are - great! Pass them on to your players, children, parents or anyone else who might benefit from learning them!

Chin It: The position of the ball after a rebound: directly under the chin with the elbows and fingers up.

Court Sense: A player's ability to be aware of everything that is happening on the court at all times.

Strong Side: The side of the court where the ball is in an offensive set.

Weak Side: The side of the court away from the ball in an offensive set.

Give & Go: An offensive strategy in which a player passes to a teammate and then cuts to the basket expecting a return pass.

Visit our Basketball Terms page to view our list of over 200 terms!

If you have any basketball terms you'd like to share with us, send them to me. I'll include them in the next issue!


6. Product Spot Light - eFundraising Program

Anyone involved in youth sports at any level, understands the importance of fundraising. Yes, fundraising is not always the most enjoyable aspect of the season - but it is certainly one of the most critical.

Extra funds are often needed for team trips and events, warm-ups, sweatshirts and other apparel, as well as basic expenses associated with running a program.

If your team or program doesn't have any money - then the players often miss out on many of these things.

With the restrictions often placed on sports and recreation budgets, team fundraising is more important than ever!

We have recently partnered with eFundraising QSP/Readers Digest, who has helped groups raise over 3.5 billion dollars since 1964. They have a variety of fundraising programs including: Chocolate, Magazines, Popcorn, Scatchcards & Cookie Dough.

Based on their many years of fundraising experience and high level of success - I highly recommend their programs. Check them out and see what they can do for you!

For some incredible fundraising tips, ideas and advice - please visit our Fundraising Page!


7. Media Center - Swish & Swish 2

I know, I know! I recommended the Swish Programs last month. Yes - you're right! So why am I recommending them again this month, right?

Well, my sons and I have been using the program very consistently with some AMAZING results. The simplicity and effectiveness of this shooting program is nothing short of incredible! My two oldest sons, ages 9 and 11, have immediately embraced the Swish Method of shooting.

Shooting instructor Tom Nordland is a fantastic teacher/coach of basketball shooting. I can't recommend this product highly enough.

Do yourself and your players or children a favor - Check This Out!

First, read my complete review of the Swish Program here. This will give you a complete understanding of our experience with this method of shooting.

Then, check out the Swish Program for yourself by clicking here!

I'm positive you'll be as impressed as we are!!


8. Pass It On

Feel free to pass this newsletter down court to any friends, parents, or coaches who could benefit from this information.

Also, if you know anyone who would like to subscribe to the Youth Hoops newsletter, simply send them this Youth Hoops link. This will take them to our newsletter sign-up page. Thanks!

And don't forget to subscribe to our Youth Hoops Blog!

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